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Wednesday, April 26, 2017
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Back in the 1960s, a woman doctor in Japan created a powerful drug to help mothers who hemorrhage after childbirth. The medicine is inexpensive to make. Safe to use. And stops bleeding quickly by helping keep naturally forming blood clots intact. The drug's inventor, Utako Okamoto , hoped the drug called tranexamic acid would be used to help save moms' lives. Every year about 100,000 women around the world die of blood loss soon after a baby is born. It's the biggest cause of maternal death worldwide. "It was Okamoto's dream to save women," says Haleema Shakur , who directs clinical trials at London School of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. "But she couldn't convince doctors to test the drug on postpartum hemorrhaging ." And so tranexamic acid has gone largely unused in maternity wards for decades. Until now. In a massive international trial, Shakur and her collaborators have shown that tranexamic acid decreased the risk of death from blood loss associated with ..
Head Coach Nick Rolovich and former Olympian Kevin Wong lend their voice to the "Hawaii Says No More" cause. They say more men need to join the charge against domestic violence and sexual abuse...
As we grow in our lifetimes, we are all faced with decisions. What do we want to do in life? Where are we going? How will I take care of my family? Sometimes, our dreams can show us the answers that we are looking for, or just help us by showing the decisions that we need...
This weekend, 12 student designers will be showcasing their designs for Honolulu Community College's annual fashion show.
Be honest: You're looking at this story thinking what else is there to add to reports on the 1992 riots that rocked LA , right? NPR has done anniversary retrospectives before, including a huge look-back on the 20th. But in the past five years, the issue of policing — how it's done, whether it's equitable, what happens when deadly confrontations occur — has become more urgent than ever. And what happened in Los Angeles that April night 25 years ago is a critical part of the current national conversation on policing and race. For the LAPD, there have been huge changes. "I can honestly say the LAPD of 2017 is not your grandfather's LAPD, and it's not the LAPD of Daryl Gates, that 25 years ago, plunged this city into the biggest riot in (modern) American history," says civil rights lawyer Connie Rice. Rice spent a lot of time from the late 1980s through the mid-90s challenging police aggression in the city's communities of color, especially people in poor part..
Be honest: You're looking at this story thinking what else is there to add to reports on the 1992 riots that rocked LA , right? NPR has done anniversary retrospectives before, including a huge look-back on the 20 th . But in the past five years, the issue of policing — how it's done, whether it's equitable, what happens when deadly confrontations occur — has become more urgent than ever. And what happened in Los Angeles that April night 25 years ago is a critical part of the current national conversation on policing and race. For the LAPD, there have been huge changes. "I can honestly say the LAPD of 2017 is not your grandfather's LAPD, and it's not the LAPD of Daryl Gates, that 25 years ago, plunged this city into the biggest riot in (modern) American history" says civil rights lawyer Connie Rice. Rice spent a lot of time from the late 80s through the mid-90s challenging police aggression in the city's communities of color, especially people in poor parts..
Hawaiʻi Police Department South Hilo Patrol, Area I Operations Lieutenant Robert Almeida Phone: 961-2213 Report No. C17011195 [See image gallery at www.hawaiipolice.com] Media Release Hawaiʻi Island police have charged a 31-year-old Puna man for an incident that occurred in Hilo on Saturday (April 22). At 5:10 p.m. on Monday (April 24), Joshua Michael Corbin, of no permanent address but known to frequent the Puna and Kaʻu districts, was charged with the felony offense of resisting an order to stop. His bail was set at $10,000.00 and he had an initial court appearance in Hilo District court on Tuesday (April 25). At 8:30 p.m. Saturday evening (April 22), South Hilo patrol officers were heading up the Puainako Extension to make checks for Corbin on an unrelated incident when they observed him traveling in the opposite direction. A traffic stop was then conducted with Corbin’s vehicle and as officers approached on foot to make contact they could hear Corbin yelling out obscenities a..
The Hawai‘i Police Department is seeking 68-year-old Glynda Dollar Evangelista of Hilo. She was last seen walking along Ululani Street on April 24, 2017, at about 3:10 p.m. She is described as Caucasian, 5’4,” 200 pounds, with hazel eyes, white medium-length hair and a fair complexion. She was last seen wearing a yellow Hawaiian print dress and a green jacket,; she was carrying a blue backpack. Evangelista has a condition that requires medication. Call the Hawaii Police Department at 935-3311 if Evangelista is seen.
Take a good, long look at his come-hither eyes. That craggy snout. Those horns that whisper such subtle dignity. Before you swoon, just answer us this one question: Wouldn't you swipe right? The Ol Pejeta Conservancy certainly hopes so. That's why the wildlife conservancy in Kenya has done something a little unusual for the rhino called Sudan: They've posted his dating profile on Tinder. The 43-year-old northern white rhino is the last male of his subspecies — though he's not alone. Beside him at Ol Pejeta are two females, who are also the last of their kind. Together, they represent a chance for the survival of northern white rhinos, which have been hunted nearly to extinction by poachers. Trouble is, matchmaking between the three has been even more strenuous than your typical singles mixer. "In human terms, [Sudan is] probably about 95 years old," Ol Pejeta CEO Richard Vigne tells NPR's All Things Considered , "so he's incapable of normal breeding." They..
After a lengthy back-and-forth, conservative commentator Ann Coulter's speech scheduled for tomorrow at University of California, Berkeley appears to be off – apparently for multiple reasons. And there is some dispute about who actually did the cancelling. Berkeley Chancellor Nicholas Dirks said in a statement that the campus could not accommodate the speech because the planned venue was deemed inadequately secure by local police, and there was no other venue available where the talk could happen safely. The university said that it had proposed alternative dates, which Coulter rejected. "[T]he UC Berkeley administration did not cancel the Coulter event and has never prohibited Ms. Coulter from coming on campus," it said. Coulter stated on Twitter that Berkeley canceled the speech, adding that she is "so sorry for free speech crushed by thugs." She said, "I'm so sorry Berkeley had a different story every 20 minutes, which always was: No speech." However, Reuters and The New Yo..
Turkish authorities have launched a massive detention operation, arresting more than 1,000 people nationwide on Wednesday. The Turkish government says the arrests are aimed at supporters of the U.S-based cleric Fethullah Gulen, whom President Recep Tayyip Erdogan blames for last year's failed coup attempt . And these arrests are by no means the end of the operation. Anadolu Agency, a state-run news service, says the government aims to arrest another 2,000 people. Germany's Deutsche Welle newspaper reports roughly 8,500 police officers undertook raids in all 81 provinces in Turkey. As NPR's Peter Kenyon reports, Interior Minister Suleyman Soylu says the government is pursuing what they call "secret imams" — a movement that allegedly transmits information and instructions through individuals known as "imams," who in this context are not necessarily Islamic clerics. Soylu and others in the government say this Gulen-supportive network has infiltrated the Turkish security for..
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XQDiTkIgPoc In her first running of the Boston Marathon, Edna Kiplagat powered across the finish line of the Boston Marathon this month nearly a minute ahead of her closest rival. Kiplagat made the 26.2 mile outing look like a spirited jog in the park. She even clocked a blazingly fast 5:02 minute mile at the 20-mile mark of Boston's storied road race. And now, as she does after every major race, she's taking two weeks off. "I'm in my second week of that right now relaxing at home with my husband," she says when reached by phone at her farm outside Eldoret, Kenya, in the western highlands. "In the afternoon, we take our children to play. My son likes golf. And my daughter likes swimming. We take them to the Eldoret Club for two hours, then come home." Two years ago, Kiplagat and her husband/coach, Gilbert Koech, bought a farm in an area where many of Kenya's top distance runners train. "We got it from a white guy from South Africa. We..
Head Coach Nick Rolovich and former Olympian Kevin Wong lend their voice to the "Hawaii Says No More" cause. They say more men need to join the charge against domestic violence and sexual abuse...
Interesting prediction at the Bloomberg New Energy Finance Conference yesterday in New York – that by 2020 – a mere 13 years from now – electric cars will account for almost a third of all new car sales. What’s makes this prediction interesting is, it came from the chief economist for Total, the French...
This month the IRS has begun using private debt-collection companies. This is a new and significant change in policy and process, but it will also open up a lot of new opportunities for scams. Prior to this change, conventional scam protection education was centered around ignoring when people...
The Department of Planning and Permitting (DPP) will host a third community workshop on Wednesday, April 26, to present the Public Review Draft of the Airport Area Transit-Oriented Development (TOD) Plan. The draft plan is the result of input gathered at community workshops, stakeholder meetings, public comments submitted to the DPP, and a survey of area residents, employers and employees. The plan addresses new development, pedestrian and traffic improvements, and public spaces aroun...
This weekend, 12 student designers will be showcasing their designs for Honolulu Community College's annual fashion show. This year's theme is KALEIDOSCOPE, which represents the student designers uniting to create beauty and design construction - a Kaleidoscope of shapes and colors. There will be a prelude...
As we grow in our lifetimes, we are all faced with decisions. What do we want to do in life? Where are we going? How will I take care of my family? Sometimes, our dreams can show us the answers that we are looking for, or just help us by showing the decisions that we need...
The campus of Hawaii Preparatory Academy in Waimea. Courtesy photo. Commencement ceremonies for the Hawaii Preparatory Academy’s 106 graduating seniors will start at 10 a.m. on Friday, May 26, in Castle Gymnasium at the school’s Upper Campus in Waimea. The ceremony is open to the public. Head of School Robert McKendry will preside. Lupe Diaz, Upper School math teacher, will deliver the commencement address. Lupe Diaz, Upper School math teacher, will deliver the commencement address. For more information, call (808) 881-4002.
Net neutrality regulations are getting yet another remake. The new head of the Federal Communications Commission on Wednesday launched his long-expected campaign to undo the regulations adopted in 2015 under former President Barack Obama. Specifically, FCC Chairman Ajit Pai wants to loosen the legal structure that placed Internet service providers under the strictest-ever oversight of the agency, in favor of a "light-touch regulator framework." "Going forward, we cannot stick with regulations from the Great Depression that were meant to micromanage Ma Bell," Pai said in a speech at the Newseum in Washington, D.C. "Nothing about the Internet was broken in 2015." Pai's plan so far lacks many specifics, but it marks the start of what's expected to be a new months-long debate. The FCC is expected to vote to formally begin the repeal process on May 18. After that, the agency would collect comments from the public and the stakeholders before crafting a detailed approach and schedul..